New Regulations for Suspended Work Platforms & Powered Chairs

Posted by  On June 22, 2017
New Regulations for Suspended Work Platforms & Powered Chairs

New Regulations for Suspended Work Platforms & Powered Chairs

What do they mean and their Impact on the Industry?

In 2009, on Christmas Eve in Toronto, a modular suspended stage failed claiming four workers lives.

The Regulation now requires that every suspended work platforms be designed in accordance with this Regulation, good engineering practices & CSA Z271-10 -With the exception of clauses 6.1.1 (b) and 6.1.2 (these are sections addressing the design loads).

Design Loads:

The Regulation limits the length of stages, modular or otherwise to 30 metres.

The legislated Live Load requirements in Ontario, which supersedes the live load requirement in CSA 271-10, is prescribed in section 137.1 (3), (4) & (5) and is a function of the span of the stage.

These sections state:

These prescribed live loads are to be used to calculate the factored load combination for the design of the scaffold:

P (ad *D + y *al * L)

Where,

P is an impact factor of 1.25

ad is a dead load factor of 1.25

D is the dead load

Y is an importance factor of 1.9

Al is a live load factor of 1.5

L is the live load taken from section 137.1 (3)

O. R.213/91 amended by 0. Reg. 242/16 s 11

137.1 (1) In addition to the requirements set out in section 137, a suspended work platform shall be designed in accordance with the requirements of this section. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

 

(2) A work platform shall not have a span of greater than 30 metres between adjacent points of suspension. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) The rated platform capacity for a suspended work platform shall use the relevant minimum live load determined as follows:

  1. If the span of the work platform between adjacent points of suspension is 12 metres or less, the minimum live load shall be 340 kilograms.

  2. If the span of the work platform between adjacent points of suspension is greater than 12 metres but not more than 15 metres, the minimum live load shall be 450 kilograms.

  3. If the span of the work platform between adjacent points of suspension is greater than 15 metres but not more than 20 metres, the minimum live load shall be 680 kilograms.

  4. If the span of the work platform between adjacent points of suspension is greater than 20 metres but not more than 25 metres, the minimum live load shall be 900 kilograms.

  5. If the span of the work platform between adjacent points of suspension is greater than 25 metres but not more than 30 metres, the minimum live load shall be 1,130 kilograms. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(4) There shall be an additional load allowance for any construction debris or abrasive blasting grit to a depth of at least 25 millimetres and for other materials that may accumulate or be placed on the work platform as a result of the work. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(5) In the case of a modular suspended work platform system, all connections used to transfer a load from one module to another shall be designed to withstand at least the design loads as specified in this section, and any other external loads or forces. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

In CSA 271/10:

6.1.2 Platform Live load for single and two-point suspensions:

The platform live load or rated capacity for a platform with single or two point suspensions shall:

  1. Include the weight of all items that are to be supported by the platform, including occupants, job-related equipment and material. This live load shall be at least:

  2. 200 Kg for a platform with a length of up to 10 m; and

    1. Note: Platforms which are designed for heavy duty applications where materials may accumulate on the platform, should be designed with additional load capacity.

  3. 300 Kg for a platform with a length greater than 10 m and up to 39 m;

  4. (When 680 Kg or less be uniformly distributed over a portion of the platform floor. The size and location shall be determined as follows:

    1. the width of the portion shall be the width of the platform;

    2. the length of the portion shall not exceed 300 mm for every 110 Kg of live load; and

    3. the location of the portion shall be such as to result in the most critical effect on the component under consideration; and

  5. (when more than 680 kg) be distributed in a manner and at a location that is in accordance with the anticipated placement of the load.

These requirements are different from the requirements of the amended Regulations in that, the majority of modular and single stages were designed or meet the design requirements of CSA Z271-10, using a factored load with L taken as 300 Kg, ensuring that the hoist rated capacity is equal to or exceed that factored load (unless higher loading was required by the owner).

Engineers designing suspended platforms in Ontario must now adhere to the legislated requirements for determining the minimum live load requirement.

CSA 271-10 committee should review these regulations.

All the above loads represent the minimum live load required for the design of a suspended work platform. The designer must allow for loads resulting from construction debris, abrasive blasting grit and all other material that may accumulate or stored on the platform.

The designer must also ensure that the stage supporting system has allowed for these additional loads.

The Regulations in Section 137.1 (5) addresses the connections of a modular suspended work platform, by requiring that connections be designed to withstand at least the design loads as specified and any other external loads or forces.

In my opinion, this section does not specifically direct a designer to the fact that metal fatigue plays a significant role in these connections. Due to wind and movement on the platform, these connections are exposed to cyclical loading and a designer is required to avoid any designs that make these connections susceptible to fatigue failure.

It Is important for designers to know that in designing suspended stages in Ontario, the live loads have increased on spans of more than 12 metres to 30 metres. in span and consideration must be given to that increase in the factored load and consider reinforcing the platform increasing the number of stirrups and suspension points.

These are minimum factored loads and must be increased if the operation of the stage would add other loads beyond 2 workers and their tools.

Industry Impact: Stages more than 12 m in length will likely require a design change by the manufacturer or a professional engineer. Special applications and additional loads must be allowed for in the design.

Design Drawings:

The design drawings for stages and support systems must now include:

  • Include the size and specifications of all components of the work platform, including the type and grade of all materials to be used.

  • State the maximum rated platform capacity of the work platform.

  • State the welding specifications for all welds used on the work platform, including weld length, weld locations and welding fillers to be used.

  • Identify all critical welds on the work platform.

Industry Impact: Professional engineers preparing a suspended stage drawing (s) must now specify requirements that were not necessarily indicated on such drawings, such as weld lengths, weld fillers and identify the critical welds on the drawing(s)

The Regulations has two sets of requirements for platforms designed before January 1, 2017 and those manufactured after that date:

For Stages manufactured prior to that date, the owner must retain the services of a professional engineer to confirm that the work platform meets the requirements of sections 137 and 137.1.

NB: Should the platform be designed to the requirements of CSA271, and is longer in span than 12 meters, a design change is likely required.

Industry Impact: Owners of suspended stages, manufactured prior to Jan 1, 2017 must retain a professional engineer to ensure that a model of the stage designed in accordance with the load requirements of the Regulations as amended.

In the case of a suspended work platform designed on or after January 1, 2017, the owner must retain a professional engineer, who will confirm that the suspended work platform design and configuration set out in sections 7 through 11 of the ANSI/UL 1322-2004 standard for the rated platform capacity and worse-case

configurations.

(The above standard requires a static load test to 4 x the rated loaded. It is the opinion of the author that this test would not ascertain that a connection between sections of a modular platform that is poorly designed and subject to stress reversal can resist fatigue failure over time. In addition, one would interpret the Regulation to mean that only a professional engineer can test the stage but not the manufacturer of such stage!).

Having said that, the test is legislated and must be conducted, and the engineer must provide the result of this test.

The engineer or the owner must also provide proof that the manufacturer of the suspended work platform is certified to ISO 9001. Quality management systems.

Should the manufacturer not be certified to ISO 9001, The professional engineer retained by the owner shall:

  • Ensure that very critical weld of the work platform is subjected to non-destructive testing by an individual certified to the requirements of CGSB or CSA W78.2, or both.

  • Examine all platform structural components to ensure that they are manufactured in accordance with the design drawings referred to in the Regulations.

Industry Impact: The owner of a platform(s) must ensure that the manufacturer of the platform is ISO 9001 certified and if not, retain a professional engineer to supervise the testing and evaluation of every critical weld and prepare a report of findings listing his/her opinion and should remedial action be required, indicate these actions and allow the platform’s continued use.

The Regulation requires that the suspended work platform is assembled in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions for assembly.

All the above documents must be available on site and available to an inspector on request.

Worker Training:

Section 138 of the amended Regulation sets out the requirement of worker training and is outside the scope of this article.

Testing:

An employer shall ensure that, prior to the first use of a suspended work platform system at a project, the entire system, including its suspension lines, has been inspected, tested and maintained in accordance with this Regulation, the manufacturer’s instructions, and clause 11 (Inspection and Testing) and Clause 12 (Maintenance) of CSA Standard Z271-10. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The employer shall ensure that the inspection, testing and maintenance referred to in subsection (1) is completed by,

  • a competent worker; or

  • if the CSA Standard Z271-10 requires the inspection or test be performed by a person with specific qualifications, such person will be retained by the owner.

Industry Impact: Prior to the first use of a suspended stage at a site or project, the entire system must be inspected by a competent person. Non-destructive testing of the welds shall be conducted by a person certified to the requirements of CSA W178.2 or/ and a technician certified to the requirements of CGSB.

For the purpose of testing a suspended access platform, the Regulations identifies two categories:

  1. Group 1, which is composed of trusses, corner or angled sections and platform modules.

  2. Group 2, which is composed of stirrups, module connectors and end frames. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

At least annually, a representative sample(s) of each type of structural component shall be randomly selected and subjected to non-destructive testing in accordance with the following:

  1. For each type of Group 1 structural component, the representative sample shall be composed of the number set out in Column 2 of the Table to this subsection opposite the total number of that type of component, set out in Column 1, in the supplier’s or employer’s entire inventory or fleet of suspended work platforms.

  2. For each type of Group 2 structural component, the representative sample shall be composed of the number set out in Column 3 of the Table to this subsection opposite the total number of that type of component, set out in Column 1, in the supplier’s or employer’s entire inventory or fleet of suspended work platforms.

  3. Every critical weld on each structural component selected as part of the representative sample shall be subjected to non-destructive testing.

Industry Impact: Owners of 2 or more stages (depending on which group they fall under), shall have the critical welds of samples of the stages as in the below table, non-destructively tested. If any defects are found, the owner must retain the services of a professional engineer, to evaluate the results of such testing and prepare a report of the action taken to repair such defects. It is not clear what an owner of one platform is mandated to do!.

Table

  1. If any defect is found as a result of the testing conducted under subsection (3), a professional engineer shall review the interpretation of the test results to determine,

    • whether the defect affects the structural integrity of the structural component; and

    • if the defect does affect the structural integrity of the structural component, whether the defective component is to be rejected from further use permanently or pending its repair. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11; O. Reg. 142/17, s. 17 (1).

  2. The professional engineer shall prepare a written report of the review and determination made under subsection (4). O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

  3. 6. If a defective structural component is rejected from further use, either permanently or pending repair, a representative sample that is composed of four times the number of each type of structural component that composed the original representative sample under subsection (3) shall be subjected to testing described in paragraph 3 of subsection (3). O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

  4. 7. If any defect is found as a result of the testing conducted under subsection (6), subsections (4) to (6) apply, with necessary modifications. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11; O. Reg. 142/17, s. 17 (2).

  5. 8. All other parts of a suspended work platform not listed in subsection (2) shall be inspected for damage at least once within the 12-month period preceding its use on a project and at least once annually while in use on a project. O.Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Equipment Logs

An employer who uses a suspended work platform system shall ensure that there are permanent equipment logs respecting components of the suspended work platform system and that the logs,

  1. comply with clause 13 (Equipment Log) of CSA Standard Z271-10; and

  2. include a record of the inspections, tests, repairs, modifications and maintenance performed on the components. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The employer shall make the permanent equipment logs available to an inspector on request. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Industry Impact: Permanent logs books must be kept, recording inspections, tests, repairs, modifications and maintenance performed on each stage.

Fixed Supports, Roof Plans, Work Plans and Installation

The supplier of or employer who owns a suspended work platform system shall ensure that all its components are marked or labelled in accordance with clause 10.2 (Markings) of CSA Standard Z271-10. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(2) The supplier of or employer who owns a suspended work platform system shall ensure that each of the following structural components of every work platform is marked with a unique identifier:

  1. A truss.
  2. An end frame.
  3. A stirrup.
  4. A module connector.
  5. A corner or angled section.

Industry Impact: Manufacturers, owners and suppliers of modular units must now identify the above components by marking with a unique identifier.

(3) Despite subsection (2), if a work platform module is manufactured as a single unit, it may be marked with a single unique identifier.

Fixed Supports for Tie Back or Fall Arrest:

  • Every Fixed support shall be designed by a professional engineer in accordance with the requirements of Regulations and CSA 271-10 using factored loads.

The following values of load factors, as described in the provisions of the Building Code that address Limit States Design, shall be applied to calculate the factored loads for an outrigger and supporting structure, excluding anchorage connectors:

  1. Live load factor = 3.0.
  2. Dead load factor = 1.25.

A component of a fixed support that may be subject to overturning shall be designed and constructed to support at least four times its allowable suspended load or force.

An anchorage connector shall be designed to resist,

  1. the application of 22.2 kilonewtons in any direction without fracture of any component or pull-out from the fixed support; and

  2. a test loading of 11.1 kilonewtons without permanent deformation of any component when subjected to the test loading in the direction or directions that generate the most critical effect on the fixed support with respect to stability and strength. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

For a suspended work platform system with a span between adjacent points of suspension of greater than 12 metres and up to 30 metres, the anchorage connectors for supporting the suspended work platform system shall be designed in accordance with good engineering practice to support the allowable suspended load and the minimum live loads for the length of the suspended work platform to be used, as set out in subsection 137.1 (3). O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Industry Impact: Professional engineers designing the stage support system must now consider the additional loads that are likely to be introduced for stages with spans of 12 m or more.

Roof Plans:

Every owner of a building or structure where a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair is to be used shall ensure that there is a roof plan for the building or structure and ensure that the plan,

  1. contains drawings and layout diagrams that show the positions of all fixed supports on the building or structure;

  2. indicates whether the fixed supports are adequate for the purposes of attaching work platforms, boatswain’s chairs and lifelines;

  3. meets the requirements of clause 10.1.2 (Roof Plan) of CSA Standard Z271-10; and

  4. has been approved in writing by a professional engineer. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(2) The owner shall post a legible copy of the roof plan near every entrance to the roof or top level of the building or structure where the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair is to be used. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) The owner shall provide a copy of the roof plan to the constructor for a project at the building or structure. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(4) The constructor shall ensure that every employer whose workers are to use the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair at the building or structure has received a copy of the roof plan. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(5) No employer or constructor shall permit a worker to use a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair on a building or structure unless the employer or constructor has received a copy of the roof plan and, if required, the design drawings and written procedures prepared under subsection 141.3 (2). O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

If the roof plan required under section 141.2 indicates that the fixed supports on the building or structure are not adequate for the purposes of attaching a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair and lifelines, if any, the owner shall provide the constructor for a project at the building or structure with any structural drawings for the building or structure that the owner has control over. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The constructor shall ensure that a professional engineer prepares, using any structural drawings provided by the owner under subsection (1), design drawings and written procedures that indicate the manner in which the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair and lifelines, if any, must be supported from the building or structure during the relevant project. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The constructor shall ensure that every employer whose workers are to use the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair and lifelines, if any, at the building or structure has received a copy of the design drawings and written procedures. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The owner of a building or structure shall ensure that all fixed supports identified in the roof plan are inspected, maintained and tested in accordance with clause 11 (Inspection and Testing) of CSA Standard Z271-10 and the manufacturer’s instructions.

The owner shall ensure that a fixed support identified in the roof plan is inspected by a professional engineer,

(a) before being used for the first time after it is installed and after every time that it is repaired or modified;

(b) as often as necessary and at least as often as recommended by the manufacturer of the fixed support;

(c) at least once within the 12-month period preceding its use; and

Industry Impact: The owner must ensure that a roof plan identifying all suspended stage or boatswain chair support is prepared by a professional engineer to meet the loading and other requirements of the Regulation and CSA Z271-10. The roof plan must be designed by a professional engineer. The owner must post a legible copy of the engineered drawing at every entrance to the roof or top level of the building or structure where the suspended work platform system or boatswain chair is to be used. The owner must provide a copy of the engineered drawing (roof plan) to the constructor for a project at the building or structure.

The constructor on his part must ensure that every employer whose workers are to use the suspended work platform system or boatswain chair is provided with a copy of the floor plan.

The owner of a building or structure shall ensure that all fixed supports identified in the roof plan are inspected, maintained and tested in accordance with clause 11 (Inspection and Testing) of CSA Standard Z271-10 and the manufacturer’s instructions.

Should the professional engineer identify a defect in a fixed support, the owner will ensure that the fixed support is not used until such support is repaired and approved by a professional engineer

(d) if a professional engineer, an employer, a supervisor or a worker advises the owner that there are reasonable grounds to believe the fixed support is defective or not adequate to support the suspended work platform, boatswain’s chair or lifeline then, the owner who has been advised shall ensure that the fixed support in question is not used until the requirements in subsections (4) and (5) are met, as applicable. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The professional engineer who performs an inspection under subsection (2) shall prepare a written report that,

(a) indicates whether the fixed support meets the requirements of section 141.1 and is adequate for the purposes of attaching a suspended work platform, boatswain’s chair or lifeline; and

(b) if the fixed support is not adequate, indicates the defects and hazardous conditions of the fixed support. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

A fixed support that has been identified in the report of the professional engineer as having a defect or hazardous condition shall not be used until the owner of the building or structure ensures that:

  • the defect or hazardous condition of the fixed support has been repaired, modified or corrected; and

  • the fixed support has been inspected and tested by a professional engineer in accordance with clause 11.3.3 (Anchorage connectors) of CSA Standard Z271-10 and the professional engineer has determined the fixed support to be adequate to support a suspended work platform, boatswain’s chair or lifeline.

  • The owner of the building or structure shall, respecting a fixed support,

  • keep a permanent record, in accordance with clause 13 (Equipment Log) of CSA Standard Z271-10, of all inspections, tests, repairs, modifications and maintenance of the fixed support if the fixed support is used;

  • make the record available, on request, to an inspector; and

  • make the record available, on request, to a constructor of a project where workers are to use a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair and lifelines, if any. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

No employer or constructor shall permit a worker to use a fixed support unless the employer or constructor has ensured that the fixed support has been inspected, maintained and tested as required by this section, and, if applicable, the requirements in subsections (4) and (5) are met. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Duties of employers whose workers are using a suspended work platform or boatswain chair: Written rescue procedures, risk assessments, work plans and site-specific work plans:

Before a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair is put into service for the first time on a project, the employer shall ensure that a competent person,

(a) prepares written procedures for the rescue of workers from a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair in an emergency;

(b) conducts a risk assessment of the work to be undertaken to identify hazards that may arise from use of the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair with reference to the nature of the workplace, the type of work and the conditions of work.

(c) prepares a written, site-specific work plan that complies with subsection (2) and, if it is a work plan respecting a suspended work platform system.

(2) A site-specific work plan for a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair shall include, at a minimum,

(a) measures and procedures to protect the health and safety of workers using the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair;

(b) procedures to install, move and dismantle the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair;

(c) an assessment as to whether the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair can be installed according to a generic installation drawing or whether it must be installed according to a site-specific installation drawing;

(d) the rated platform capacity of the suspended work platform, suspended work platform module or boatswain’s chair;

(e) the weight of all materials, tools and equipment allowed to be on the suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair;

(f) how all suspension lines and lifelines are to be attached to the fixed supports shown in any roof plan required under section 141.2;

(g) an identification of the hazards related to material hoisting, cutting, grinding and sandblasting associated with the work;

(h) an identification of all electrical hazards, including minimum distances when approaching electrical conductors;

(i) protection for the public and workers who may be below the suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair;

(j) overhead protection for workers on a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair from any work being conducted above the suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair;

(k) measures to be taken to protect workers using a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair from weather and other conditions that may endanger them;

(l) a copy of the written procedures for the emergency rescue of workers from a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair in an emergency established under clause (1) (a);

(m) the maximum number of workers allowed on a suspended work platform, suspended work platform module or boatswain’s chair;

(n) information about methods of fall protection, including installation, that may be used for the protection of workers using a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair; and

(o) information about ready access to a two-way communication system, such as radio, telephone or other similar means, to be provided to a worker using a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) In addition to the above, a site-specific plan for a suspended work platform system shall include, at a minimum,

(a) how the work platform is to be arranged in any location at which the platform is to be used on the project;

(b) a weight distribution plan to ensure loading across the work platform or suspended work platform module surface does not exceed the design capacity;

(c) the maximum amount or weight of debris, grit and other materials allowed to accumulate on the suspended work platform, and their permissible locations on the work platform; and

(d) an assessment as to whether a device may be used to transfer material to and from the work platform and, if it may, directions on how it is to be used.

(4) The employer shall keep at the project, and make available to an inspector on request, the site-specific work plan.

(5) The employer shall,

(a) ensure that the site-specific work plan is implemented at the project; and

(b) before a worker begins installing or using a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair at the project, provide the worker with a copy of the site-specific work plan and review it with the worker.

Only a designated competent worker who has successfully completed the training program under section 138.1 shall install, alter or dismantle a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair

(2) A suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair, including all components and connections of the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair, shall be erected, installed, used and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and,

(a) a generic installation drawing; or

(b) in the case of a suspended work platform system, a site-specific drawing if not all the requirements in the generic installation drawing can be satisfied or if one of the circumstances set out in subsection (3) applies.

(3) The following are circumstances for the purposes of clause (2) (b):

  1. There will be stacked or tiered work platforms.

  2. There will be a work platform that, including its components, weighs more than 525 kilograms.

  3. There will be a work platform that has a span greater than 12 metres between adjacent points of suspension.

  4. There will be a work platform that has more than two primary suspension lines.

  5. More than two hoisting devices will be used to move a work platform.

  6. There will be a work platform that has any shielding, tarpaulin, enclosure, sign or banner on it that may increase the wind loads on the components of the suspended work platform system.

  7. The vertical distance between the top of a suspension line and the lowest point on the street, ground or other horizontal surface under a work platform will exceed 150 metres. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

If a generic drawing applies:

* A designated competent worker who has successfully completed the training program under section 138.1 shall inspect a suspended work platform system or powered boatswain’s chair to determine whether the installed suspended work platform system or installed powered boatswain’s chair complies with the drawing,

(a) before it is put into service after it has been installed for the first time on a project; and

(b) if it is relocated at the project, at the new location before it is put into service. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) The designated competent worker shall provide a written report of the inspection indicating whether the installed suspended work platform system or installed powered boatswain’s chair complies with the drawing. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(4) The suspended work platform system or powered boatswain’s chair shall not be put into service unless the designated competent worker’s report indicates that the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair has been installed in accordance with the drawing. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(5) While the suspended work platform system or powered boatswain’s chair is at the project, the employer shall keep at the project, and make available to an inspector on request, the generic installation drawing and every report prepared by a designated competent worker under subsection (3). O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Industry impact: The above are mandated duties of employers. Employers utilizing a suspended work platform or boatswain chair must adhere to these requirements.

Site Specific Installation Drawings:

* The site-specific installation drawing shall be prepared by a professional engineer.

* A professional engineer shall inspect a suspended work platform after it has been installed for the first time at a project and before it is put into service and shall prepare a written report indicating whether the suspended work platform complies with the drawing

* A suspended work platform shall not be put into service unless the professional engineer’s report indicates it has been installed in accordance with the drawing. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

* If a suspended work platform system is relocated at a project, a deviation from the site-specific drawing is permitted if the deviation is approved by a professional engineer. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

A suspended work platform system shall not be put into service at the new location unless,

(a) the suspended work platform system was inspected,

(I) if the installation at the new location was in accordance with the site-specific drawing, by either a professional engineer or by a designated competent worker who has successfully completed the training program under section 138.1, or

(ii) if the installation at the new location was in accordance with the site-specific installation drawing and a deviation from it was approved by a professional engineer, and

(b) a report prepared under subsection (7) or (8) indicates that the suspended work platform system has been installed in accordance with the drawing and approved deviations, if any,

In the case of an inspection, the professional engineer or designated competent worker shall provide a written report of the inspection indicating whether the installed suspended work platform system complies with the drawing. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Thee professional engineer shall provide a written report of the inspection indicating whether the installed suspended work platform system complies with the drawing and approved deviations.

While the suspended work platform system is at the project, the employer shall keep at the project, and make available to an inspector on request, the site-specific installation drawing, any approved deviations and every report prepared under this section. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Project-Specific Use Requirements:

The employer shall ensure that the rated platform capacity of a suspended work platform, work platform module or boatswain’s chair is posted conspicuously on the suspended work platform, work platform module or boatswain’s chair.

(1) A suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair and the suspension lines of the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair shall be attached to a fixed support in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

(2) Every suspension line of a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair shall,

(a) be made of wire rope, subject to subsection.

(b) be vertical from the fixed support, including the outrigger beam;

(c) be parallel to every other suspension line, if any;

(d) extend to the ground or have a positive stop that prevents the suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair from running off the end of the suspension line or lines;

(e) have each connecting end wrapped around a protective thimble and adequately fastened;

(f) be capable, along with its attachment components, of supporting at least 10 times the maximum load to which it may be subjected; and

(g) have fastenings and terminations that are,

(i) corrosion-resistant,

(ii) capable of developing at least 80 per cent of the rated breaking strength of the suspension line itself,

(iii) recommended by the manufacturer for use with suspended work platforms or boatswain’s chairs, and

(iv) installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) A U-type rope clamp shall not be used on a suspension line or tie-back. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(4) A hoisting device on a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair shall,

(a) have legible operating and safety instructions affixed to it in a conspicuous location; and

(b) meet the requirements of clause 8 (Hoisting) of CSA Standard Z271-10.

(5) A suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair shall not be loaded in such a manner as to exceed the rated platform capacity for its work platform or individual platform module, or the rated hoist capacity. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(6) A work platform or boatswain’s chair shall not be suspended or used at any time the wind speed exceeds 40 kilometres per hour. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(7) If an outrigger beam is to be used as a fixed support, it shall,

(a) be tied back and securely fastened to the building or structure, or a component of the building or structure, by a secondary cable or wire rope capable of supporting the allowable suspended load;

(b) be secured against horizontal and vertical movement;

(c) have securely attached counterweights that are designed and manufactured for the purpose; and

(d) have adequate legible instructions, provided by the manufacturer or a professional engineer, for the use of the counterweights affixed to the outrigger beam. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

All wire rope terminations of the suspension line of a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair, including swaged socket and poured socket terminations, spliced eye terminations and turnback eye terminations shall, after installation onto the wire rope and prior to being used for the first time, be tested,

(a) in accordance with the recommendations of the manufacturer of the wire rope or termination; and

(b) to no more than 50 per cent of the wire rope’s nominal or minimum rated breaking strength. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

While the suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair is at the project and the termination remains in service, an employer shall keep at the project, and make available to an inspector on request, a record of the tests described in subsection (1).

The wire rope termination of a suspension line shall be protected from contact with the line’s hoisting device. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The suspension line of a boatswain’s chair shall be made of wire rope unless the boatswain’s chair is equipped with a descent control device. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(2) Every suspension line of a boatswain’s chair shall be protected from abrasion. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) Every suspension line of a boatswain’s chair that is made of organic or polymer fibres shall be,

(a) permanently marked with the date on which it was first put into use;

(b) doubled from the fixed support of the line to the ground or egress level;

(c) tested by a recognized testing laboratory two years after the date on which it was first put into use and then once every 12 months thereafter to assess whether,

(i) it has experienced abrasion, and

(ii) is capable of developing at least 80 per cent of the rated breaking strength of the suspension line itself; and

(d) discarded,

(i) if the test required under clause (c) determines that it does not have a breaking strength of at least 10 times the static load that the line is intended to support,

(ii) in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations, or

(iii) when it is no longer safe for use. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(4) A boatswain’s chair shall have a seat or seating area that is at least 600 millimetres long and 250 millimetres wide. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(5) If the seat or seating area is supported by a sling, the sling shall be constructed of wire rope at least nine millimetres in diameter which crosses under the seat or sitting area.

(6) If a boatswain’s chair has a descent control device,

(a) the distance between the boatswain’s chair and the fixed support shall not exceed 90 metres; and

(b) a worker on the boatswain’s chair shall not use a corrosive substance, or mechanical grinding or flame-cutting equipment if the suspension line is not made of wire rope. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11

Before a suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair is used for the first time each day, a competent worker shall identify any defects or hazardous conditions and document them in writing.

The suspended work platform system or boatswain’s chair shall not be used until the defects or hazardous conditions have been corrected or removed. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

The employer shall keep a copy of each document prepared by a competent worker under subsection (1) and make it available to an inspector on request. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

An employer shall ensure that a competent worker performs a functional test of a work platform or powered boatswain’s chair to ensure that it is operating in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions,

(a) before it is used for the first time after it is installed at the project;

(b) if it is relocated at the project, at the new location before it is put into service; and

(c) before it is used for the first time each day. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(2) If a functional test performed under subsection (1) reveals defects or hazardous conditions, the work platform or powered boatswain’s chair shall not be used until the defects or hazardous conditions have been corrected or removed. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) The work platform or powered boatswain’s chair shall not be raised more than 30 centimetres during the functional test unless it has a hoisting device equipped with a remote operating device. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(1) A worker who is on or is getting on or off a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair shall wear a full body harness connected to a fall arrest system.

(2) Every worker on a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair shall have an effective means of summoning assistance in case of emergency. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(3) Every lifeline used with a suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair shall,

(a) be suspended independently of the suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair;

(b) be securely attached to a fixed support so that the failure of the suspended work platform or boatswain’s chair will not cause the lifeline to fail;

(c) be protected from damage and abrasion; and

(d) if subject to wind conditions,

(i) not be suspended a vertical distance of more than 150 metres below the fixed support, and

(ii) if suspended a vertical distance of more than 100 metres below the fixed support, be restrained at or near the midpoint. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(4) Despite clauses (3) (a) and (b), the lifeline may be securely fastened to a work platform if,

(a) all or part of the suspended work platform has more than one means of suspension; and

(b) the suspended work platform is designed, assembled and maintained such that the failure of one means of suspension will not result in the complete or partial collapse of the suspended work platform. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(5) A suspended work platform shall have hangers located at least 150 millimetres but no more than 450 millimetres from the ends of the platform that are securely attached to it. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(6) If the suspension height of a suspended work platform is 15 metres or greater, the suspended work platform shall, if practicable, be restrained to the exterior face of the building or structure that it is suspended from unless the suspended work platform is being raised or lowered. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

(7) If a suspended work platform is stationary and its guardrail adjacent to the face of the building or structure has been removed or lowered, the suspended work platform shall be restrained to the building or structure. O. Reg. 242/16, s. 11.

Prepared by Ralph Balbaa, M.Eng., P.Eng.,

Registered Consultant,

President,

HITE Engineering Corporation.

The author has been a member of the CSA 271 committee for over 25 years.

HITE Engineering Corporation has unmatched skills to provide you with any engineering required for suspended platforms, powered boatswain chairs and their support system.

— Ralph Balbaa M.Eng., P.Eng., is a health and safety expert with more than 40 years of engineering experience and a former Ministry of Labour consultant. He is the President of HITE Engineering, a Mississauga-based consulting firm specializing in industrial and construction safety.

0 Comment
Share Us On:
Leave A Comment